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Welcome to Moodle!
by Admin User - Tuesday, August 21, 2012, 12:07 PM
 
Welcome to the new EWC Moodle site! This site will replace any of the previous instances of Moodle you may have used and will be the only Moodle site for EWC from Spring 2011 onward.

To login, please use your EWC username and password. This is the same username and password you use for your email or to login to computers on campus.

If you have any questions or need assistance, please contact support@ewc.edu.

If you need help with your password, please use the Password Manager:
http://iamatiger.ewc.edu/password
 

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This course is designed for students who plan to major in fields that do not require an in-depth study of mathematics.  The major topics introduced in this course are set theory, symbolic logic, combinatory, probability, geometry and finance. This course is designed to give students an introduction to different topics in mathematics and its relationship to real world applications by understanding and symbolizing patterns.

Catalog Description:

Practice in News Gathering; Development of Sources, Evaluation, and Writing as required in the Print Media. Major attention is given to contemporary issues, events, problems, and ethical considerations.

 Course Purpose & Description:

In this class you will explore the role and uses of news and information in a democratic society. We will focus on news reporting that goes beyond events and provides meaningful context to stories. Lab assignments will provide practice gathering, evaluating, and reporting data and information from electronic sources to augment other sources.

This course is an introduction to computer programming using Visual Basic.NET as the vehicle language.  Microsoft Visual Basic.NET has emerged as the most popular environment for building full-featured Windows applications quickly and easily.  The Visual Basic.NET environment empowers novices to create applications that provide fast and effective solutions to business needs.  This course assumes no prior knowledge of computer programming.

Course Description

EWC 102 is a part of all freshman students’ first-year experience orientation program which has been carefully designed to help students learn and demonstrate writing skills essential for collegiate studies.  Students will be introduced to academic writing and its associated conventions, styles, and qualities. EWC 102 is a comprehensive writing intensive course embodying the fundamentals of effective communication within the standards of academics.

Course Description

EWC 102 is a part of all freshman students’ first-year experience orientation program which has been carefully designed to help students learn and demonstrate writing skills essential for collegiate studies.  Students will be introduced to academic writing and its associated conventions, styles, and qualities. EWC 102 is a comprehensive writing intensive course embodying the fundamentals of effective communication within the standards of academics.

Course Description

EWC 102 is a part of all freshman students’ first-year experience orientation program which has been carefully designed to help students learn and demonstrate writing skills essential for collegiate studies.  Students will be introduced to academic writing and its associated conventions, styles, and qualities. EWC 102 is a comprehensive writing intensive course embodying the fundamentals of effective communication within the standards of academics.

Course Description

EWC 102 is a part of all freshman students’ first-year experience orientation program which has been carefully designed to help students learn and demonstrate writing skills essential for collegiate studies.  Students will be introduced to academic writing and its associated conventions, styles, and qualities. EWC 102 is a comprehensive writing intensive course embodying the fundamentals of effective communication within the standards of academics.

Fundamentals of first Aid and emergency response. Instruction in fundamentals of First Aid and emergency response. Instruction in fundamentals of first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and AED general emergency responses.

This course provides an overview of the field of Global Marketing with an emphasis in International Finance to determine & assess the values of both internal and external tasks in operation of a business, for a service or manufacturing business entity. This includes the formulation of an effective mix of different business processes and organizational objectives. The objective of this course is to provide the student with a macro perspective of global marketing functions within operations of a business to determine the overall performance value of Management, Marketing, and Finance within the organization. The main emphasis is to develop the students’ appreciation of Quantitative Analysis within operations of a business within the 21st Century

This course provides students with both field experience and practical classroom lectures. Students enrolled in this course will be required to complete a minimum of 240 contact hours working in an industry setting.These contact hours will be supplemented with classroom discussions that will cover the following areas:

  • Business Writing
  • Oratorical Effectiveness
  • Interviewing
  • Business Ethics
  • Research Skills
  • Time Management
  • Business Etiquette

I am wishing everyone a very successful Spring 2014 session.

ENG 101A (Accelerated English Comp I) - This course is designed for students whose score on an approved assessment did not meet minimum requirements on the English/Writing portion of the assessment to be placed in ENG 101. ENG 101A is an accelerated course covering the topics of the advanced study and practice of writing by reviewing basic grammar functions of the sentence, paragraph, and essay with a focus on meeting standards of academic writing. Attention is paid to both narrative and rhetorical writing strategies; the rhetorical situation: audience, purpose, and theme. Students must master the conventions appropriate to academic writing situations; students will be exposed to ideas from rhetorical grammar, reading, writing, and analyzing a variety of texts, including written, digital, or visual. Students are to learn standards of American Psychological Association (APA) citation format as a focus of one of their papers. Lab assignments are a requirement of this course. Teacher: Gail Cato-Pratt
ENG 101A (Accelerated English Comp I) - This course is designed for students whose score on an approved assessment did not meet minimum requirements on the English/Writing portion of the assessment to be placed in ENG 101. ENG 101A is an accelerated course covering the topics of the advanced study and practice of writing by reviewing basic grammar functions of the sentence, paragraph, and essay with a focus on meeting standards of academic writing. Attention is paid to both narrative and rhetorical writing strategies; the rhetorical situation: audience, purpose, and theme. Students must master the conventions appropriate to academic writing situations; students will be exposed to ideas from rhetorical grammar, reading, writing, and analyzing a variety of texts, including written, digital, or visual. Students are to learn standards of American Psychological Association (APA) citation format as a focus of one of their papers. Lab assignments are a requirement of this course.
ENG 101A (Accelerated English Comp I) - This course is designed for students whose score on an approved assessment did not meet minimum requirements on the English/Writing portion of the assessment to be placed in ENG 101. ENG 101A is an accelerated course covering the topics of the advanced study and practice of writing by reviewing basic grammar functions of the sentence, paragraph, and essay with a focus on meeting standards of academic writing. Attention is paid to both narrative and rhetorical writing strategies; the rhetorical situation: audience, purpose, and theme. Students must master the conventions appropriate to academic writing situations; students will be exposed to ideas from rhetorical grammar, reading, writing, and analyzing a variety of texts, including written, digital, or visual. Students are to learn standards of American Psychological Association (APA) citation format as a focus of one of their papers. Lab assignments are a requirement of this course.

Catalog Description: A study of the legal issues affecting the mass media, with emphasis on libel, defamation, FCC rules and regulations, copyright laws, advertising, and the basic legal philosophy related to all media, as well as the study of the historical development of press freedom & responsibility, and ethics in the mass media professions.

Course objectives: This course is designed to prepare students to understand the basics legal considerations peculiar to mass media. It is not a "law" class in the sense of preparing one to be a lawyer; rather, it is a course to help journalists avoid the need for lawyers. The emphasis will be on creating understanding of the legal framework within which the American press and its journalists must work.

Course Description:

Study and practical experience in studio production, including switching, lighting and working in a multi-camera environment. 

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Produce and direct video productions with realistic understanding of resources and goals.
  2. Translate scripts into video images and television and film programs.
  3. Understand the business of broadcasting and video production.
  4. Learn and demonstrate the operation of video field and studio recording and video editing systems.

A continuation of MCM 309; further study and practical experience in advanced radio production techniques, including programming. Student projects will focus on various types of productions done at both commercial and noncommercial stations.

 

Objectives of Course: At the conclusion of the course the student should be able to: 

 

Exhibit advanced use of radio production equipment

Use computer applications in radio production

Understand and use the multi track recording process

Independently produce long-form radio productions

Understand more complex commercial production techniques

Use Adobe Audition or all projects

Emphasizes the basic elements of photography for the mass media, including newspapers, advertising and web. Students learn how to compose, shoot, edit (using Photoshop) high quality images for newspapers, magazines and the internet. Emphasis on news photography and the relation of the written word to the visual image.

At the end of the course, students who completed all assignments and participated in class and group discussions should be able to identify how business organizations use resources to provide services to the end user. Students should also be able to describe the different types of business organizations and identify stakeholders that influence the success of a business

Course Description

EWC 102 is a part of all freshman students’ first-year experience orientation program which has been carefully designed to help students learn and demonstrate writing skills essential for collegiate studies.  Students will be introduced to academic writing and its associated conventions, styles, and qualities. EWC 102 is a comprehensive writing intensive course embodying the fundamentals of effective communication within the standards of academics.

Course Description

EWC 102 is a part of all freshman students’ first-year experience orientation program which has been carefully designed to help students learn and demonstrate writing skills essential for collegiate studies.  Students will be introduced to academic writing and its associated conventions, styles, and qualities. EWC 102 is a comprehensive writing intensive course embodying the fundamentals of effective communication within the standards of academics.

This course provides an opportunity for all students to acquire knowledge and motor skills in major and minor sports, along with regular physical exercise and health information.

COURSE OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this course is to provide students

with the skills to communicate in Spanish at the beginning to intermediate novice level.

 

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:

At the end of a semester of study, students will be able to perform as indicated in each of the following areas:

  • Listening comprehension: The student will be able to listen and respond to questions in the target language about everyday topics.
  • Speaking: The student will be able to describe the world that surrounds him/her in the present tense, compare and contrast, and talk about events in present.
  • Reading: The student will be able to read and provide written responses in target language using vocabulary and grammar appropriate to a novice learner.
  • Cultural information: The student will be able to become familiar with some basic cultural perspectives and practices related to these topics, as well as products of Hispanic cultures (i.e. works of art, architectural styles, traditional foods, etc.), and to identify Spanish-speaking countries on the world map.
  • Linguistic development: The student will be able to identify the components of language (e.g. verbs, subject pronouns, articles, nouns) and principles of word formation (e.g. masculine, feminine).

 

This is the beginning course in a three-semester sequence of calculus. Topics to be covered include Functions, Limits of function, Differentiation of  Algebraic, Trigonometric, Exponential and Logarithmic functions, and  applications of limit, differentiation to other fields. 

This course is an introduction to personal financial management, including basic financial planning, savings, and basic investment practices. Students will learn how to create a budget, plan for the future, which include consumer buying, personal credit, savings and family savings, investment, home ownership, insurance and retirement, as well as making good purchasing decisions.

This course is designed to introduce the principles and application of networking and telecommunication fundamentals.  Data communication and telecommunication protocols and models, standards and Standard Organizations, hardware and software implementations are studied.  Installation, configuration, management and
administration skills are gained in the laboratory.

This is a first course in concepts of systems analysis and design.  It defines and describes the five traditional phases of the systems development life cycle and uses a case study approach to illustrate concepts. Recent technological impacts of the Internet and World Wide Web are integrated into subject matter to help students understand what computers can do in the modern world and the many considerations involved in exploiting their potential successfully.

Course Description

EWC 102 is a part of all freshman students’ first-year experience orientation program which has been carefully designed to help students learn and demonstrate writing skills essential for collegiate studies.  Students will be introduced to academic writing and its associated conventions, styles, and qualities. EWC 102 is a comprehensive writing intensive course embodying the fundamentals of effective communication within the standards of academics.

Course Description

EWC 102 is a part of all freshman students’ first-year experience orientation program which has been carefully designed to help students learn and demonstrate writing skills essential for collegiate studies.  Students will be introduced to academic writing and its associated conventions, styles, and qualities. EWC 102 is a comprehensive writing intensive course embodying the fundamentals of effective communication within the standards of academics.

This course provides an understanding of the fundamentals of accounting-- including balance sheet, income statement, statement of retained earnings and other reports. It is an introduction to accounting principles, which emphasizes the fundamentals of preparing, analyzing, and using the accounting information to make business decisions. The course will cover areas in accounting, which encompass journal entries, general ledger, trial balance, income statement, balance sheet, inventory methods, bank reconciliation statement, etc. It will touch the essence of accounting in sole proprietorship business, partnership business, and corporations. It will cover the complete accounting cycle for merchandising and service entities, beginning with the Accounting Equations to computing the financial statements.

DR. FRANCIS A. IKEOKWU, SR.

Dr. Francis Ikeokwu

COURSE OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this course is to provide students

with the skills to communicate in Spanish at the beginning to intermediate novice level.

 

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:

At the end of a semester of study, students will be able to perform as indicated in each of the following areas:

  • Listening comprehension: The student will be able to listen and respond to questions in the target language about everyday topics.
  • Speaking: The student will be able to describe the world that surrounds him/her in the present tense, compare and contrast, and talk about events in present.
  • Reading: The student will be able to read and provide written responses in target language using vocabulary and grammar appropriate to a novice learner.
  • Cultural information: The student will be able to become familiar with some basic cultural perspectives and practices related to these topics, as well as products of Hispanic cultures (i.e. works of art, architectural styles, traditional foods, etc.), and to identify Spanish-speaking countries on the world map.
  • Linguistic development: The student will be able to identify the components of language (e.g. verbs, subject pronouns, articles, nouns) and principles of word formation (e.g. masculine, feminine).

 

This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations.

Course Description

EWC 102 is a part of all freshman students’ first-year experience orientation program which has been carefully designed to help students learn and demonstrate writing skills essential for collegiate studies.  Students will be introduced to academic writing and its associated conventions, styles, and qualities. EWC 102 is a comprehensive writing intensive course embodying the fundamentals of effective communication within the standards of academics.

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of personal computing as well as the social, ethical, philosophical and economic implications of computer technology. Topics include the Windows operating system, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentation aids, Internet, e-mail and related areas.

This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations.

ENG Comp. 102 is a continuation of the principles of rhetoric studied in Comp. 101 with an emphasis on extended training in the methods and application of expository writing; also including the process of logical thinking. Its primary emphasis is placed on persuasive and argumentative writing. This will require writing short and lengthy papers, as well as writing documented research papers from 1000-1,500 words or more. LATE Research papers and assignments will not be accepted for any reason. Chapter Readings from the textbook along with other assignments including open discussion, handouts, tests, quizzes and note taking is considered mandatory and not voluntary, in order to pass this class with a C or better. Please refer to the syllabus given at the initial beginning of class. Thank you, Ms. Cato-Pratt (Assistant Professor of English)
This course teaches the major social science research (techniques, concepts, themes, theories) methodologies and examines how we can apply them in the real world. One of the major goals is to enable one to develop a question from the perspectives of social sciences that could be applied in the real world to test its validity. The above means: the course will provide one with a framework that will help one to investigate social events and understand their causes & even make conscious choices of actions in the develop-ment of the society. Also, through participation, readings along with class lectures, discussion and participation one will be able to assess one’s own life experiences and get acquainted with the challenges of Scientific Social Research Methods.

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of personal computing as well as the social, ethical, philosophical and economic implications of computer technology. Topics include the Windows operating system, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentation aids, Internet, e-mail and related areas.

The objective of this course is to provide students

with the skills to communicate in Spanish at the intermediate to advanced novice level.

 

At the end of a semester of study, students will be able to perform as indicated in each of the following areas:

  • Listening comprehension: The student will be able to comprehend speech containing short sentences and simple structures.
  • Speaking: The student will be able to speak in sentences that have relatively simple structures and concrete vocabulary. Pronunciation, intonation and rhythm should be adequate enough to be understood by a native speaker.
  • Reading: The student will be able to read familiar material in a recombined form, either dialogue or narration. (S) He should deduce meanings of a limited number of new items in a passage through the general context of the passage.
  • Writing: The student will be able to re-combine familiar vocabulary and structure in slightly different order or format. (S) he should be able to express a personal thought briefly, using familiar vocabulary and structure.
  • Cultural information: The student will be able to acquire some rudimentary knowledge about the cultural heritage of the country (or countries) and be able to contrast the foreign culture with his or her won in an informal manner.
  • Linguistic development: The student will be able to identify the components of language (e.g. verbs, objects, prepositions) and principles of word formation (e.g. prefixes, suffixes, diminutives, superlatives).

 

This course is designed for students who plan to major in fields that do not require an in-depth study of mathematics.  The major topics introduced in this course are set theory, symbolic logic, combinatory, probability, geometry and finance. This course is designed to give students an introduction to different topics in mathematics and its relationship to real world applications by understanding and symbolizing patterns.

This course is an introduction to personal financial management, including basic financial planning, savings, and basic investment practices. Students will learn how to create a budget, plan for the future, which include consumer buying, personal credit, savings and family savings, investment, home ownership, insurance and retirement, as well as making good purchasing decisions.

The objective of this course is to provide students

with the skills to communicate in Spanish at the intermediate to advanced novice level.

 

At the end of a semester of study, students will be able to perform as indicated in each of the following areas:

  • Listening comprehension: The student will be able to comprehend speech containing short sentences and simple structures.
  • Speaking: The student will be able to speak in sentences that have relatively simple structures and concrete vocabulary. Pronunciation, intonation and rhythm should be adequate enough to be understood by a native speaker.
  • Reading: The student will be able to read familiar material in a recombined form, either dialogue or narration. (S) He should deduce meanings of a limited number of new items in a passage through the general context of the passage.
  • Writing: The student will be able to re-combine familiar vocabulary and structure in slightly different order or format. (S) he should be able to express a personal thought briefly, using familiar vocabulary and structure.
  • Cultural information: The student will be able to acquire some rudimentary knowledge about the cultural heritage of the country (or countries) and be able to contrast the foreign culture with his or her won in an informal manner.
  • Linguistic development: The student will be able to identify the components of language (e.g. verbs, objects, prepositions) and principles of word formation (e.g. prefixes, suffixes, diminutives, superlatives).

 

This course is an introduction to personal financial management, including basic financial planning, savings, and basic investment practices. Students will learn how to create a budget, plan for the future, which include consumer buying, personal credit, savings and family savings, investment, home ownership, insurance and retirement, as well as making good purchasing decisions.

This course prepares students for a wide variety of careers in the field of Finance, including Portfolio Management, Economics Financial Analysis, Financial Services and Banking. It is designed to develop a broad-based analytical range of knowledge that can be utilized by those interested in careers involving the management of both large and small organizations, as well as to provide a firm foundation for students interested in general business careers. The course topics rely on interdisciplinary approaches, developed based on basic business components such as Economic Theory, Accounting, Information Systems and Decision-Sciences.

Course Description

EWC 102 is a part of all freshman students’ first-year experience orientation program which has been carefully designed to help students learn and demonstrate writing skills essential for collegiate studies.  Students will be introduced to academic writing and its associated conventions, styles, and qualities. EWC 102 is a comprehensive writing intensive course embodying the fundamentals of effective communication within the standards of academics.

This course is designed for students who plan to major in fields that do not require an in-depth study of mathematics.  The major topics introduced in this course are set theory, symbolic logic, combinatory, probability, geometry and finance. This course is designed to give students an introduction to different topics in mathematics and its relationship to real world applications by understanding and symbolizing patterns.

Course Description

EWC 102 is a part of all freshman students’ first-year experience orientation program which has been carefully designed to help students learn and demonstrate writing skills essential for collegiate studies.  Students will be introduced to academic writing and its associated conventions, styles, and qualities. EWC 102 is a comprehensive writing intensive course embodying the fundamentals of effective communication within the standards of academics.

The Principles of Marketing course provides a comprehensive analysis on key Marketing topics. The following areas will be discussed: • Strategic Marketing • Social Responsibility in the World of Marketing • Marketing Research & Information Systems • Consumer Behavior • Market Segmentation and Targeting Markets • Product Development, Pricing and Promotion • Distribution of Goods

The   learning outcomes for this course   include:

  • The introduction to the theories, techniques and concepts of management and its functions
  •   
  • Planning, organizing, motivating, influencing and controlling which will be examined as means to solving management and group functioning  problems
  •   
  • Topics that include the classical, behavioral and systems approach to managing, negotiation, efficiency and effectiveness

 

  • .
An overview of basic economic concepts and institutions. An introduction to macroeconomics which deals with the theories of employment, inflation, money, backing, economic growth and development, the public sector, and how these are influenced by government fiscal and monetary policies.

A study of Microeconomics which builds upon the basic concepts and theories attained in Economics I to develop a real-world understanding of key economic factors.

This course is an introduction to personal financial management and other basic money management concepts to enable students to make knowledgeable financial decisions.